Pirates Free Tanker and Crew   1 comment

Marine Express

BY MAREX 

Pirates have freed the tanker Marine Express and her 22 Indian crew. Ship management company Anglo-Eastern said the tanker had been freed on Tuesday, and the crew were safe. The cargo of 13,500 tons of gasoline remains on board.

The Marine Express went missing in the Gulf of Guinea after contact was lost in Benin on Friday.

Anglo-Eastern issued a statement saying: “A complete investigation will be carried out into the hijacking, and we wish to express our gratitude to the captain and crew of the vessel and their families for their courage and fortitude in dealing with this difficult situation, as well as to all of the authorities and agencies involved.”

The pirate attack was the second in three weeks off Benin. On January 9, U.K. shipowner Union Maritime lost contact with the product tanker Barrett, which was at anchor off Cotonou. The Barrett had been taken by pirates, and her crew were in captivity for six days while a “resolution process” moved forward. The crew and the vessel were eventually released.

Piracy is a common occurrence in the Gulf of Guinea, where criminal groups based in the Niger Delta have the capability to raid shipping far out to sea. Several instances of armed robbery are reported monthly in the region. Piracy experts suggest that a higher occurrence rate is likely, and is masked by under-reporting.

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Posted March 13, 2018 by rrts in -NEWS

Second Tanker Goes Missing in Gulf of Guinea   1 comment

gulf
The Marine Express, 2010 (file image courtesy Shipping Database / Korpan)

BY MAREX 

On Friday, Hong Kong-based ship management group Anglo-Eastern reported that it has lost contact with the product tanker Marine Express at a position off Benin.

As of 0330 hours GMT on Thursday, when she was last in touch, the Express was at an anchorage off the port of Cotonou in the Gulf of Guinea, an area known for a high risk of piracy. She had 22 crewmembers and 13,500 tons of gasoline on board.

If the Express‘ disappearance is the result of a hijacking, it would be the second in three weeks off Benin. On January 9, U.K. shipowner Union Maritime lost contact with the product tanker Barrett, which was at anchor off Cotonou. The Barrett had been taken by pirates, and her crew were in captivity for six days while a “resolution process” moved forward. The crew and the vessel were eventually released.

Piracy is a common occurrence in the Gulf of Guinea, where criminal groups based in the Niger Delta have the capability to raid shipping far out to sea. Armed robbery is also a routine problem, with several instances reported every month; piracy experts suggest that a higher occurrence rate is likely, and is masked by underreporting.

Posted March 12, 2018 by rrts in -NEWS

Hot Water Thrown on Pirates   1 comment

MV Kudos 1
MV Kudos 1

BY MAREX 

An attack by suspected Abu Sayyaf pirates was thwarted on Friday after boiling water mixed with oil was poured on the men as they tried to board the vessel.

The MV Kudos 1 was sailing off the waters of Basilan in the Philippines when it as attacked by men in three motorboats. After their boarding attempt failed, the pirates fired shots at the vessel and caused some damage and minor injuries as a result.

Lieutenant General Carlito Galvez Jr, Western Mindanao Command Commander, praised the actions of the crew who foiled the attempt before naval and coast guard forces arrived on the scene. On arrival, Coast Guard personnel treated the injured crewmen, and naval ships escorted the vessel to anchorage.

Last year, ReCAAP ISC praised the quick-thinking action of crew, saying a drop in the number of incidents was an indication of their efforts. For example, on March 5, general cargo ship, Phu An 268 carrying 2,700 tons of rice departed My Thoi port, Vietnam, for Sandakan, Sabah, Malaysia. At about 1600 hrs, a skiff with six pirates on board approached and followed her for around 1.5 hours. The master and the crew raised the alarm, increased speed and activated the water hose to prevent the pirates from boarding. The master informed the Malaysian authorities immediately, and in response, the Malaysian Royal Navy deployed vessels immediately to the location of the incident to provide assistance and escort Phu An 268 safely to Sandakan port.

In another case, on February 22 at 1345hrs, bulk carrier Donghae Star was underway in the vicinity of about 37.8 nautical miles northwest of Littoral Monitoring Station Bongao, Tawi-Tawi when the ship sighted three fast boats painted in black with five pirates on board wearing black clothes. The boats were chasing after the ship at a speed of about 20.5 knots. The crew immediately contacted the Philippine Navy by radio. The Navy deployed patrol vessels to the location, and the three speed boats slowed down and stopped their chase.

Posted February 22, 2018 by rrts in -NEWS

Pirates Free Tanker and Crew   1 comment

Marine Express

BY MAREX 

Pirates have freed the tanker Marine Express and her 22 Indian crew. Ship management company Anglo-Eastern said the tanker had been freed on Tuesday, and the crew were safe. The cargo of 13,500 tons of gasoline remains on board.

The Marine Express went missing in the Gulf of Guinea after contact was lost in Benin on Friday.

Anglo-Eastern issued a statement saying: “A complete investigation will be carried out into the hijacking, and we wish to express our gratitude to the captain and crew of the vessel and their families for their courage and fortitude in dealing with this difficult situation, as well as to all of the authorities and agencies involved.”

The pirate attack was the second in three weeks off Benin. On January 9, U.K. shipowner Union Maritime lost contact with the product tanker Barrett, which was at anchor off Cotonou. The Barrett had been taken by pirates, and her crew were in captivity for six days while a “resolution process” moved forward. The crew and the vessel were eventually released.

Piracy is a common occurrence in the Gulf of Guinea, where criminal groups based in the Niger Delta have the capability to raid shipping far out to sea. Several instances of armed robbery are reported monthly in the region. Piracy experts suggest that a higher occurrence rate is likely, and is masked by under-reporting.

Posted February 22, 2018 by rrts in -NEWS

Second Tanker Goes Missing in Gulf of Guinea   1 comment

gulf
The Marine Express, 2010 (file image courtesy Shipping Database / Korpan)

BY MAREX 

On Friday, Hong Kong-based ship management group Anglo-Eastern reported that it has lost contact with the product tanker Marine Express at a position off Benin.

As of 0330 hours GMT on Thursday, when she was last in touch, the Express was at an anchorage off the port of Cotonou in the Gulf of Guinea, an area known for a high risk of piracy. She had 22 crewmembers and 13,500 tons of gasoline on board.

If the Express‘ disappearance is the result of a hijacking, it would be the second in three weeks off Benin. On January 9, U.K. shipowner Union Maritime lost contact with the product tanker Barrett, which was at anchor off Cotonou. The Barrett had been taken by pirates, and her crew were in captivity for six days while a “resolution process” moved forward. The crew and the vessel were eventually released.

Piracy is a common occurrence in the Gulf of Guinea, where criminal groups based in the Niger Delta have the capability to raid shipping far out to sea. Armed robbery is also a routine problem, with several instances reported every month; piracy experts suggest that a higher occurrence rate is likely, and is masked by underreporting.

Posted February 5, 2018 by rrts in -NEWS

Ships at Risk from Sea Mines Near Yemen   1 comment

file photo: Yemeni soldiers
file photo: Yemeni soldiers

BY MAREX 

In response to the threats arising from the conflict in Yemen, BIMCO, ICS and INTERTANKO have published interim guidance on maritime security in the southern Red Sea and Bab al-Mandeb. Shipowners and operators should be aware of new threats in the area, say the organizations. The European Union Naval Force (EUNAVFOR) and the Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) have advised that a range of threats other than piracy, such as sea mines and water-borne improvised explosive devices (WBIEDs), are potential risks in the area.

Missiles

Missiles are long range, accurate and powerful weapons and have been used against military ships in the region. There is no indication that merchant shipping is likely to be deliberately targeted, but there is the risk of misidentification or collateral damage to merchant shipping.

Sea Mines

Sea mines have been used to deter and deny Saudi-led coalition forces access to key ports in Yemen’s southern Red Sea area. Whilst merchant shipping is not the target, sea mines may affect commercial ships using these ports or routeing close to the Yemeni Coastline.

Water-Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (WBIED)

An attack involving a WBIED is likely to involve one or more skiffs approaching the merchant ship at high speed firing both small arms and Rocket-Propelled Grenades (RPGs). One or more of the boats may be laden with explosives. On the basis of current understanding it is assessed that merchant shipping is unlikely to be directly targeted by a WBIED, however the risk of collateral damage or misidentification remains.

Attacks

WBIED attacks have been used against Saudi coalition warships and associated assets such as military supply ships in the southern Red Sea. The MV Muskie (May 31, 2017) and MV Galicia Spirit (October 25, 2016) incidents, which took place in the southern approaches to the Bab al-Mandeb (BAM), highlight a non-piracy attack by groups operating in Southern Yemen. In these incidents there was an explosion during the approach and, likely attempted boarding respectively. This tactic marked a significant departure from Somali piracy and, other incidents associated with the Yemen conflict, and as such the likely intent and perpetrators are not clear.

Two separate incidents on January 6, 2018 approximately 45 nautical miles off the port of Al Hudaydah, Yemen, involved suspicious approaches to two merchant ships by two speed boats carrying armed personnel with optical equipment and one unmanned boat. After the merchant ships undertook evasive action, the speed boats broke off their approach. The speed boats subsequently approached a tanker under escort and the escort vessel engaged the speed boats and destroyed the unmanned vessel.

Guidance

The guidance stresses the importance of using the Maritime Security Transit Corridor, registration with MSCHOA and reporting to UKMTO, as well as reviewing and updating risk assessments and plans to include these new threats. The guidance also includes advice specific to identified threat types, including WBIEDs and complements the guidance provided in BMP 4.

The Interim Guidance on Maritime Security in the Southern Red Sea and Bab al-Mandeb is available on the BIMCO, ICS and INTERTANKO websites.

Posted January 27, 2018 by rrts in -NEWS

JORNADA DE ENTRENAMIENTO EN CATALUÑA (ESPAÑA) 3 Y 4 DE MARZO DEL 2018   Leave a comment

JORNADAS DE ENTRENAMIENTO

Posted January 25, 2018 by rrts in -TRAINING